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20130724
20130801
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Book TV 17
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CSPAN2 17
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2013 6:45am EDT
21 months. the confederates were confined to the sort of defensive warfare that they could least afford. after gettysburg, the sun never shone for the south again. but there were other costs for the confederacy imposed by gettysburg beyond the simple fact that defeat and discouragement and disarmament. the army of northern virginia reported 2592 killed, 12,700 would, and 4150 captured or missing after gettysburg. 20,451 casualties in all based on the data that we have collected by the army of northern virginia is chief medical officer, lafayette deal. i see alexander webb has come back. that's encouraging. but the mouse i was going to click has not. [laughter] [applause] >> powerful little thing, isn't it. there is our numbers. they look even worse in cold print. given the inadequacy of military record-keeping in the civil war, there were, for instance, no grace or registration years. these losses suffered by the army of northern virginia may have been even higher than these official figures. but even beyond the simple numerical shock of the casualty lists, lee's army suffered a
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 8:00am EDT
teams, prime minister, secretary of state, minister of defense, chief financial officer, united nations body with a few students, world bank body and arms dealers. put that into the other questionable side about human nature and eagerly play the role. and random stock market and random -- random events to determine the severity of emergencies or good fortune. we also have a center, this is not always but sometimes in the office that student is my best student, i want to use that student's skill sets so i asked that student would you use your ability to get in trouble so much and cause so much disruption to the good of the game and other students and they jump at the chance so that student has to have a two infold job. they are playing their role in the world peace game, trying to win the game, there are two objectives to solve the crises and raise asset values beyond the starting point, trying to do that, senator confusion agent and at the same time through this information, ambiguities, irrelevancies, misleading, they cannot lie out right, they are trying to destroy the entire game so
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 7:00am EDT
destroyed, we only have snippets of it, and she writes a very painful article called in defense of american sportsmanship. and for every argument that she gives for internment she gives one against it. and to conceal profoundly conflicted she is. she fights with fdr to adopt japanese-american families legally. she has japanese-american penpals in the camps. she sends packages to the camps. she writes, she is correspondence with justice william brennan in california -- william denton in california was a dissenting judge to try to use his decent arguments to fdr. and she doesn't make that publicly. she finally splits with fdr in 44 and comes out against him. but there's that very painful silence, and you can tell how distressed she is because she writes it chills my soul to think of american children behind barbed wire. so you can see. the second thing is, it's hard to explain but it has to do with, with some internal behind the scenes deliberations about how to get breckenridge long fired. and breckenridge long, was a very old political ally of fdr. played a huge role in his nomination in 19
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 4:30pm EDT
commissioned by the then secretary of defense robert mcnamara. basically put together for him in the late 1960's to sort of answer the question, how did we become involved in the war in vietnam. one could say maybe we should have asked those questions before we became involved with the war in vietnam. put together a lot of scholars to write this summary, starting in 1945 right after world war ii how of the u.s. gradually and then with ever greater speed became involved in the war in vietnam. and this at a time when the war was not going well trying to get out of it. very, very difficult. and when i was retained in 1971, when the new york times was provided with a copy of all but three volumes of what became known as the pentagon papers by confidence as sources, the government had advised the terms that if they publish this and it was all classified as top secret that the government would take steps, the government would go to court to get a court order barring the * from doing so. that is sort of the background of the case. every document in all these volumes was classified as top secret which
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 8:00pm EDT
and habitat destruction that go to the city's. they start to move to make impact. by a political defensive way to bring private equity in two cities because they have relied on the municipal-bond market. if the fed is not what we know it to be. this can have a huge impact. >> i had a question about natural capital and have not carry the book and i don't know how that can help i like your comments on that. >>. >> what about the natural space flood plain and simply a one dash improve the economy of cities and urban areas? >> i think we see examples all over the country. it is a different type of gridlock and particularly in places of portland or get, it is that it the country but one of the few metropolitan areas go to the web site is called we build green cities. we protect the resources and said we build more denis communities and transit oriented with that has done is have the environment of thugs that basically are experts in sustainable products and services. what has happened last five or seven years given urbanization and in china and india people come to portland to really cast aside the
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 2:00pm EDT
on at the time. they also defended the right of black women in self-defense holding up the case of rosa lee who defended herself against an attacker and sent to jail. there was a large campaign about that. that kind of organization adds women not around narrow gender issues, but the right of women to exert leadership around, you know, traditional womens' issues, black women's issues and freedom issues in general. another organization she worked with was the all-african freedom movement which she founded in london in 1961 with claudia jones who was new yorker originally from trinidad who was jailed and exiled for her communists beliefs. for her radical beliefs and they joined together to embrace the african des a per are a and talk about what liberations would mean for women all over the world. so we're holding up the issues i think was important. i think in term of how we see black women in history, i think we are still in a marcus syndrome. people fall in to it. i have looked in books it's embarrassing. we don't feel like token i. is necessary anymore. i think there's a way in which there's an
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 8:00pm EDT
that he handled during his career as a criminal defense attorney and he shared stories from his returns is the mayor of las vegas. this is about one hour. >> the book is "being oscar." it is written by oscar goodman. mayor oscar goodman, why did you come to las vegas? >> we came here in 1964. i went to a wonderful liberal arts college in philadelphia. i loved every day of college. i went to law school at the university of pennsylvania and it was the time of the civil rights movement were was very active. the students that were there were interested in corporate law and the like. i had just gotten married. i felt bad that i wasn't supporting my wife. one day i decided to walk down to city hall to the da's office and say, you have a job. and i was very lucky because they took me to the office of arlen specter. he was just coming off of a win of the conviction of a teamster. i think i'm the only person that did that. and a wealthy widow was killed. two fellows took money and took it out to las vegas and they assigned me to going over there on a motion to suppress this. at the end of the me
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 10:00am EDT
manhattan. was on trial for the murder of a woman named elmer stands. mr weeks's defense attorneys were aaron burr and alexander hamilton. kind of interesting. really was remarkable trial that took place as the country was coming into being and to have these two rivals as your defense attorney. and won't give away the ending of the trial or the book itself. remarkable book as well. so far that is the book, books i am presently reading. >> let us know what you are reading this summer, tweet us at booktv. post it on our facebook page or send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. >> the first problem with conventional ways of explaining secularization has to do with the historical time line. secularization has been understood by most great modern thinkers and for that matter plenty of mediocre ones as a process in which religion slowly but surely vanishes from the earth or it least it's more sophisticated precinct. as people become more educated and prosperous the collective story goes, the same people come to find themselves more skeptical of religion's premises. they find themselves less ne
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 7:00pm EDT
was beth mchenry who was a communist organizer who had worked for the international labor defense on the scottsboro case in alabama, and she put him in touch with some communist organizers and the city and in "now let us praise famouse men" he writes actually he met with him several times. people who work, quote, spies and enemies. that's who he's talking about. his first night he went to the county where all sharecroppers unions had been founded to hear a speech by the conrad. so when he went to the south he was in the context of the communist party organizing. now over the next five years, his attitudes towards communism and the communist party changed. but, you know coming you can see that conflict in the epigraph to "now let us praise famouse men," which begins with a quote from the king juxtaposed a quote from the communist manifesto. but the fact that the communist manifesto reads quote code these words are here to mislead those will be misled by then." so with agee and you always get the kind of point and the conflict which is right there on the page. >> are you saying that
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 9:00pm EDT
number or superior to remain. you adopt a defensive strategy. and this will work for you for a reason that's really important. we don't have to win. they have to win. as long as we don't lose, we win. and that's what happens. we never really when the war. they just decide to give up. you know, at the end of the war on the trees and there's over 3,000 british troops still in north america. but they just decided to leave. washington learns this lesson and some of 1776 or the thought process that leaves at the the lesson is that at that time to the it's hard for him to accept this. a potentially, he does. and if you think about it, many of the great generals in world history are losers. hannibal, napoleon, robert e. lee rommel. washington was not a good general. he lost more battles than he won. but he was a winner. he was a winner because of his resilience and the insight he had at the strategic level. i think my time is kind of up. i will end with one somewhat controversial question or statement. when the war in iraq was ratcheting up, i got a call from one of the hotbeds of the l.a. t
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 1:00pm EDT
oscar." mr. goodman talk about cases he handled during his career as a defense attorney and shares stories from his terms as the mayor of las vegas. this is about an hour. the name of the book, it's written by the former las vegas mayor come oscar goodman.eing sc when did you come here and why? >> 1964. i went to a wonderful liberal arts college in the outskirts of >> w philadelphia and i loved every day of college. when i went to law school the university of pennsylvania was e time the civil rights movement wasi very active. however, the students that were there were interested in corporate law and the like. i just got married and felt i. supporting my life so one day i decided to walk down to the city hall call into the d.a office and said to you have ae s job is their clerkship available and i was very lucky because thr inspectors were just coming offo a win of a conviction in the united states.m we spoke and he said i would love to hire you.viction of i have a dollar an hour i think i'm the only person that went ts the law school but did that and a wealthy widow was killed and
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 3:30pm EDT
in the military, foreign and internal defense. this is what it is supposed to look like. so it has a legacy to it, but honestly is a pretty good story, too. we try to write it like a thriller so if you're looking for an analysis on politics and a really good look at the government and what he did wrong in policy you want a peace center that gets you into bolivia 1967 and runs you through it in a kind of a fast-paced life and you will like this. so if there are any questions now, thank you all for coming out we appreciate you coming. let's get some questions now. i like the discussion. [applause] the >> i read the book after he spent 30 years with castro that there were three people castro feared. one of them disappeared in a plane trip that never in that anywhere the second one the arrested because castro didn't have the guts to do it himself and then the third one was che guevara who was out of control, and from what i am dressed in the book he was very clear in saying that he basically turned them over and sent him to bolivia to his death actually tipping off the american cia that, you know, ba
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2013 8:45am EDT
history tv, president obama and defense secretary chuck hagel commemorate the 60th anniversary of the korean war armistice. that's also this morning at 10. >> this summer booktv's been asking washingtonians, legislators and viewers what they're reading, and here's what some of you had to say. >> several panels discussed the themes of the book, and you can check that out on booktv.org. >> c-span's covered several events in which edward snowden's come up, watch those by searching for edward snowden on c-span.org. >> a few years ago, booktv or covered an event to talk about the monuments men, and you can watch that online at booktv.org. what are you reading this summer? post on our facebook wall, tweet us or send us an e-mail to let us know what's on your reading list. visit all our social media sites to see what others are reading, and we might even share your posts here on booktv. >> i think sort of interestingly that the korean war in a sense sort of helped the south korean, south koreans unify themselves in a way that was not there before. when the communists came down, they w
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 8:30am EDT
to do anymore. we need accountability, transparency. the bank would say in its defense, and it's true to some extent that it has made moves towards transparency. it has a website. you can go on the website. you can download the and reports back to 1930, two or three languages. you can see the list of staff that worked there and the bank has a twitter feed. mostly tweets in news about speeches by other central bankers and they say they've shifted towards that. but my position is there's so much further to go. and i think it will a just because how do we know it's going to happen to the future by looking at the past? throughout the decade for 70 years it's very smart institution. just continually reinvented itself, often under pressure but it has, knows how to adapt and how to move. like i said, when the european central bank left and it was no longer continue the year they realized with got to bring china and brazil and india. we have to do that. so i'm sure that will happen nowadays. what i propose is that the bank issue of the block of shares, well, first the banks set up a foundatio
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 10:45am EDT
in germany. we were just in defensive action. i was in the headquarters company at the infantry regiment and on the staff of the colonel with others. i had the rank of corporal. i escape the front line trench warfare but was subject accounts and artillery fire. spent much of the first birthday on the frontline, march 6th 1918. went out on patrol with the patrol group that night. we spent two months in that sector which was be cemented down. well, that was our first sector. two months later we were moved to another sector, the tool sector. .. >> thinks that it they have seen and done 85 years earlier. in fact, something i learned very quickly, people aged 100-113 is that at that age it's very much a matter of first and last out. and so most of these people could recall at least to some extent details of things they are done 80, 90, even 100 years earlier. there was a gentleman in fact named fred hale from new sharon main whom i interviewed in december of 2003 am one of the things we talked about was new year's day 1900. i'm not sure fred could of told him what he had for breakfast that mo
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 9:30am EDT
on the top. the defense opened up like iceland volcano that we saw recently. they just start spewing lava. so again it's not explosive. it is law by using out of huge cracks and there's multiple events. answer in this northern area of 10 jia, this event went on for about i would say a thousand years. so it was 1000 your eruption. and what happened was over time the gases and ash that were released from the volcanic eruption were kind of like a super industrial revolution. they were releasing so much carbon into the environment that the climate first started to cool down and in the heat it into a super green's. the oceans became very aesthetic and creatures died out in incredible numbers but it was the worst mass extension of the planet has ever seen. by the end of that million year period, 95% of all species on the planet have died out. even insects i doubt which is very unusual. you usually don't see in sick to death in a mass extension but it was sea creatures, land creatures, plants. everybody was screwed by the volcano. but there was one survivor on land who kind of is the creature that a
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
pushed for the manhattan and was on trial for the murder character in his defense attorneys were both alan -- shared for a and alexander hamilton. there was a remarkable trial that took place in the '70s. but to have these rivals, i was not give away the ending. >> the first problem to explain secularization is that it is understood by great modernist in their plenty of mediocre ones that the process that decisions slowly but surely go for mayors or the more sophisticated precinct hamas as they become more acre gated in more prosperous. >> some of these find themselves more skeptical. but somewhere in the long run but this could take a while. and to be famous lee predicted the four months death to reach everyone but no matter how long come there has been the posted limit among secular figures that in the long ride but again this has been assumed by many people not to be accurate. just like the candles on a birthday cake. individual we have until there is nobody left. but there are some problems with this idea. first-come of the conventional story line does not describe the realities o
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17